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C13 End of Foundations projects

Last September, more than 400 students from Cohort 13 started their journey to become Software Engineers, all over the world! To conclude the Foundations program, they built a Portfolio project. Here is a snippet of some of our students’ (great) projects.

Ahmed Belhaj, Amine Bondi, and Mohamed Chedli from Holberton School Tunis worked on a project called Quick Report. This is a cross-platform application to replace the standard paper process when filing an accident in Tunisia it helps the auto insurance Company manage their Client, and users to fill a report easier and faster from their mobile phone. Read more.

Quick Report

Gustavo Hornedo and Angel González, from Holberton School Puerto Rico, worked on a project called Clock In, which is an app that matches gig workers with employers that have short-term openings and temporary work.

Jared Beguelin, Jeffrey Martínez, and José Fabián Rosa, from Holberton School Puerto Rico, worked on a project called Find My Face. This face recognition app helps you sort through images and identify selected faces in group photos or photo collections. 

Find My Face

Joshua Carreras and Jaime Martínez, from Holberton School Puerto Rico, worked on a project called Go to College. It is a platform that helps students identify career paths based on their strengths and interests, and then matches them with the post-secondary education options that better fit their individual preferences and needs.

Go to College

Nicolás Portela, Sebastián Olmos, Roberto Ribeiro and Luciana Sarachu, from Holberton School Uruguay, worked on a project called readIT. It is a platform for sharing paper books, it aims to facilitate cultural access through the implementation of a network of second-hand books, contributing to sustainable consumption, and spreading the values of the community, with the book as an invaluable cultural piece and factor of union between people.

readIT

Cecilia Giudice, Julián Arbini, and Soledad Frechou, from Holberton School Uruguay, worked on a project called PlayerTrack. It is a daily use app for the different members of a team sport, in order to centralize all relevant player and team data with the ultimate objective to produce better results through a predictive model of injuries, post-injury analysis, and performance indicators.

PlayerTrack

David Alzate Alzate, Mauricio Sierra Cifuentes, and Victor Manuel Plaza, from Holberton School Cali, worked on a project called edu inspector. Automate Code-inspector.com, Escalate your business processes, Automate, Control, and Report easily Code-inspector.com data with Edu-inspector Dashboard, Manage your team Metrics, Make business decisions based on data, Get all your team Violations, Duplicates, Long functions, and Complex functions in one place.

edu inspector

Nicolas Herrera Castro, Estephania Calvo Carvajal, and Carolina Hernandez Viveros, from Holberton School Cali, worked on a project called Bomberbot Course Manager, which is an application integrated with the Bomberbot CMS to create and modify courses and visualize its relationships.

Bomberbot Course Manager

Tomás Gómez, Andrés Aristizabal, and Carlos Úsuga, from Holberton School Medellin, worked on a project called Smart Rev. It is a state of the art application that allows creators and their teams to trace the revenue produced by a creation while getting paid automatically through the Ethereum Blockchain. Check it out

Smart Rev

Giraluna Gomez Londoño, Yeferson Julian Losada Mendez, and David Steven Ramirez Osorio, from Holberton School Medellin, worked on a project called Zero Click Mail. Ditch the forms, increase your response rate and automatically get email replies into a spreadsheet. Check it out

Zero Click Mail

Andrés López and Diego López, from Holberton School Bogota, worked on a project called SKEXIE. It is a REST API developed for Torre using a custom trained NLP (Natural Language Processing) Machine Learning model to analyze, process, and extract relevant skills and experience required from job post offers in order to automate manual extraction into Torre’s format. Read more.

SKEXIE

Leonardo Valencia, Andrés Sotelo Durán, Juan Carlos Hernández, and Rolando Quiroz, from Holberton School Bogota, worked on a project called The Escape Room. A Text-based escape room game, powered by machine learning. The main objective is to explore the capabilities of Machine Learning combined with the tools of a text messaging platform such as WhatsApp, and demonstrate the scope of these technologies within the chatbot agent automation business model. Check it out and give it a try.

The Escape Room

Andres Campo, Andrés González, and Adrian Felipe Vides Jimenez, from Holberton School Barranquilla, worked on a project called Tree House. “Tree House” is a Patreon implementation for Immigo that will solve the need of the instructors to help them keep track of who of their students are up-to-date with their payment and will have access to resources. Check it out.

Tree House

Kellie Mogg, Jasmine Choi, Lauren Dobratz, and Allen Nicholson, from Holberton School Tulsa, worked on a project called Tulsa Maps project, a web application, a web mapping platform featuring locally owned businesses in the Tulsa area. This project was based on the sole fact that localizing the Oklahoma economy would be beneficial to everyone. We feel passionate about giving our community an easily accessible map with a plethora of places to find. As a group, students want to bring awareness to local businesses as they are often overlooked by bigger franchises.
Read more: tulsamaps.herokuapp.com

Paul Manot, Huy Nguyen, and Thibaut Bernard, from Holberton School France, worked on a project called Back-to-the-picture. The idea popped into their heads when they were surfing. They could see photographers on the beach and they knew they could be taking great pictures that they would never see. And thought that a platform on which you could search pictures by location and date would solve that need. That’s how BTTP, an aspiring social network for events was born. Read more

Congratulations C#13 on finishing Foundations! We’re super proud of you and wish you all the best for Specializations! Let’s do it!

 

C10 End of Specialization projects

Friday, May 7, 2021, Cohort 10 ended Specialization. To conclude their journey at Holberton School, students had to build a Portfolio project. Here is a snippet of some of our students’ (great) projects.

AR/VR Specialization

Inès Chokri from Holberton School Tunisia worked on a project called “The Witch’s Trial” which is a VR game (arcade/adventure) in which the player is a witch and will have to pass a trial to prove their worth as one. The player will go through multiple levels (only one level has been made for now). Each level is timed and is different from the other as it tests every time the ability of the witch. The first level is the Flying test. The witch has to fly with a broom through circles and collect diamonds before time runs out. Pink rings add additional time, red rings subtract time and asteroids take a diamond from the witch.

Project: The Witch’s Trial

Justin Majetich from Holberton School New Haven worked on a project called “VR Wheelchair“. It is a manual wheelchair locomotion system for virtual reality applications. The system will be packaged as a complete player controller rig which can be easily imported into an existing Unity project. VR Wheelchair is motivated by a general interest in representation within gaming. It also addresses a key strength and weakness in the medium of VR — immersion and locomotion, respectively. Read more about the project.

Project: VR Wheelchair

Machine Learning Specialization 

John Cook from Holberton School Tulsa worked on a project called “Quantum Machine Learning vs Classical Machine Learning“. This project covers a comparison between the two and describes where quantum machine learning is useful right now. Read more about this project.

Project: Quantum Machine Learning vs Classical Machine Learning

Diego Felipe Quijano Zuñiga, Oscar Rodriguez, and Samir Millan Orozco from Holberton School Colombia (Cali) worked on a project callled “COVID-19 radiography detection“. This project attempts to detect through the use of data and image analysis tools in the field of Machine Learning, such as convolutional neural networks or deep neural networks, the detection of COVID-19 SARS COV2 in chest X-ray images.

Project: COVID-19 radiography detection

Web Stack Specialization

Jhoan Stiven Zamora Caicedo, Angel Omar Pedroza Cardenas, Javier Andrés Garzón Patarroyo and Michael Orlando Cocuy Garzón from Holberton School Colombia (Bogota) worked on a project called “SolucionesYa“. Pitch: Allow freelancers to get exposure on the internet by publishing the services they provide and their contact information in a centralized information hub.

Project: SolucionesYa

Aura Marina Pasmin, Carlos Daniel Cortez Pantoja, Felipe Satizabal Vallejo, and Jorge Chaux from Holberton School Colombia (Cali) and Holberton School Tunisia, worked on a project called “Agora Events“. Pitch: Web application under the start-up mode, which aims to generate a virtual communication space for companies and people to highlight their events. The application is designed for people to post or attend different types of events as corporate, academic, cultural, and sports.

Project: Agora Event

Khalil Sdiri and Rakia Somai from Holberton School Tunisia worked on a project called “Postme“. A MERN social media application with users, posts, likes, and comments – developed using React, a GraphQL server that uses Node and Express to communicate to a MongoDB Database and fetch and persist data to the app back-end.

Project: PostMe

Congratulations C#10 on finishing Specializations! We’re super proud of you and wish you the best of luck in your future career in Computer Science! Let’s do it! 

Learn more about our specialization programs here.

Holberton School Tulsa: Upskilling the locals, and attracting outside talents

The assumption of 19th century education was that building a student’s knowledge base is everything. But, today, with the biggest library that has ever existed at everyone’s fingertips (the internet), skills are what matter. Content is not the problem. Learning how to learn is the future of education.

It’s time for Open Educational Resources. The education system needs to evolve at the same rapid pace as the technology sector, which is the fastest-growing, changing, and evolving industry in history.

Making Education accessible to the many is the core mission of Holberton School. We empower motivated and talented people to succeed in their dream careers. Also, we aim at helping communities to upskill, attract and retain tech talent. 

As part of that effort, in 2020, we extended our accessibility in the USA by partnering with the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation to open a Holberton School in Tulsa

Tulsa’s fun and vibrant culture and entrepreneurial spirit have built a city that embraces inclusion and champions big ideas. In the middle of a technological renaissance, Tulsa’s emerging technology sector is on its way to making the city a new American tech hub. 

Tulsa’s leaders have made significant commitments to diversify the city’s economy and grow its tech jobs infrastructure. Countless private and public sector partners have developed innovative programs to attract tech companies and investments to the Tulsa area and supply them with highly-trained employees. 

With organizations like Tulsa Remote bringing Tulsa onto the national stage for remote working, and groups like Tulsa Innovation Labs and 36 Degrees North making Tulsa a place for startups and innovative technologies to bloom, there has never been a better time to think about joining the technology sector in Tulsa!

Along with plenty of job opportunities in Tulsa, there are lots of reasons to learn to code in this stimulating and promising environment. For example:

  • Holberton School Tulsa offers up to $1500 monthly need-based assistance for eligible students;
  • Holberton School Tulsa’s flexible financing options include a reduced Income Share Agreement for students who live in Tulsa after graduation, students can see their ISA repayment rate reduced to 10% of their income for 3.5 years after graduation.
  • Tulsa boasts a 61% lower cost of living than big cities like New York and a 43% lower median house price than the national average. 

Since its opening in January 2020, Holberton’s Tulsa school quickly outgrew its original premise and will soon offer a new 12-month program and will double in size by April 2022

“Anyone can learn to code! Computing can be found everywhere in today’s world and, to build solutions to real-world problems, we need software engineers with diversity of thought and experiences. Holberton not only also recognizes that diversity and collaboration are important, but actively removes barriers to foster diverse coders and uses peer-learning as a critical component of developing both our technical and soft skills.” — Kelsie, Cohort 11 Holberton School Tulsa.

Whether you are a recent high school graduate, have recently become unemployed, or are looking to go back to school to change careers, there’s a place for you at Holberton School Tulsa! Come learn Full-Stack Software Engineering, Web Development, AR/VR, Low Level & Algorithms, or Machine Learning! Apply now.

Sources: The Tech Future Has Arrived in Tulsa ; Next Stop For The Great Tech Migration: Tulsa

How a Foundation turned Tulsa into a startup city

Experimenting, catalyzing, and risk-taking for big goals are essentials for every Silicon Valley entrepreneur; they are also for Ken Levit, Executive Director of the George Kaiser Family Foundation (GKFF) – a philanthropic organization based in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The city, long known for being the Oil Capital of the World, is in the process of re-inventing itself to renew the shininess of the early 20th century.

George Kaiser is a Tulsa-native who led the energy family business to be highly successful. But as the city’s pivotal role in the energy industry eroded, dragging its economy along, he created a foundation to give back and help his community with the mission of focusing on early childhood education as a way of interrupting the cycle of poverty and, more broadly, to give equal opportunity to all.

GKFF achieves that mission by focusing on three main pillars: talent, economic opportunities, and city life quality. Levit chose to drive the foundation with a startup mindset “philanthropy can be good at trying new things, having a high-risk tolerance for failing, and if it’s a flop, we can try something else!”.

By partnering with Foundry College, Tulsa expects to provide talent that the U.S. economy needs. Their program management curriculum prepares students to accept one of the 22 million jobs that should be created by 2027. At the same time, the college Salesforce Administrator program targets the 400k jobs expected by 2022. Michael Basch, the managing partner at Atento Capital, estimates that students graduating from the Salesforce program will be able to find remote jobs paying up to $65,000 a year. Atento Capital and GKFF partnered to offer both programs for free – each valued at $6,000 – to local students. 

The foundation also partnered with us, Holberton School, a software engineering program training Silicon Valley grade developers. With campuses on five continents, our graduates are getting hired by the world’s top companies like Apple, Tesla, Rappi, and LinkedIn. Students don’t pay their tuition until they find a job. For the Tulsa campus, GKFF is sponsoring a $1,500/month need-based living assistance for students. The unemployment rate in computer-related occupations dropped from 3 percent in January to 2.5 percent in May. The pre-pandemic U.S. economy had 918,000 unfilled IT jobs and included the suspension of H-1B visas. Individuals using these visas had been used to fill many openings in computer-related professions. With these changes, the market for software talent is expected to be hot.

Levit explains that while “the world of economic development is focusing on recruiting companies, by throwing money and tax incentives at them,” they wanted to take a different approach that is about people. On top of upskilling the locals, GKFF is investing in attracting outside talent. The Tulsa Remote program offers to anyone who wants to move and work from Tulsa a $10,000 stipend, a desk in a co-working space, and help to find a home. The results are just astonishing: they received over 20,000 applications with thousands of additional candidates currently in the pipeline. Since the program started in 2018, 250 people have moved to Tulsa with a 95% retention rate, leading to the purchase of 40+ homes. The program attracts high-quality talent and provides an average salary of over $100k. These statistics are not surprising, considering these remote workers are working for top companies like Cisco, ADP, Deloitte, IBM, and Microsoft.

The city itself is starting to attract the interest of leading businesses. Tulsa was among the top two choices for Tesla’s next facility, competing with Austin. A talent pipeline development leader working for Google told Basch that the company would consider opening offices in the city once they could provide 500 software engineers, a goal that he hopes to achieve soon with the help of Tulsa University and Holberton School.

But that’s not it. Levit also wants its fellow neighbors to enjoy life in Tulsa and is looking to have a “culture, stimulation, a rich and vibrant life.” Among many projects, The Gathering Place park, which Basch describes as “Disneyland meets Central Park,” is the most distinctive. A 100-acre green space developed with a half-billion-dollar investment, featuring entertainment for kids and adults.

The pair recognize that there is still a lot to be done and that the city’s economy – still mainly driven by oil, gas, and aerospace – faces significant challenges made worse by the pandemic. But they also believe that it is a turning point for the local economy. COVID-19 has drastically increased the number of companies willing to let their employees work remotely. They are now also considering hiring remotely, where talent can be cheaper than in the megalopolis. Basch thinks that NYC, with Michael Bloomberg, was “the MVP city for 2001 to 2010,” followed by Texas for 2011 to 2020. He believes that Tulsa is strategically placed for the decade to come.

Learn more by listening to Holberton Co-founder Sylvain Kalache interviewing GKFF’s Ken Levit and Michael Basch.

Holberton School comes to Tulsa, OK!

Today, with assistance from the George Kaiser Family Foundation, Holberton School is announcing our latest campus, Holberton School Tulsa! And at our newest campus, in line with our dedication to improve access to our education, we are introducing both a need-based living assistance program and a discounted Income Share Agreement (ISA) for Holberton School Tulsa students who stay and work local.

Our need-based living assistance program is designed to help Holberton students focus on what matters most: Learning skills that will propel them down a new career path. Holberton students at our Tulsa campus can apply for a need-based $1500/month living assistance program to help pay for their living expenses. We want to help all qualified students make the most of their education here at Holberton, and instead of making education decisions based on affordability, we want to help students make their education decisions on what will help them achieve their dreams.

Our new living assistance program, in partnership with the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation, helps us deliver more on the challenge we give to every student who walks through our doors: The challenge to “Define Your Future”. By reducing or eliminating the economic burden to pursue a full time education, we hope to help even more people take their own future into their hands with Holberton School.

This $1500/month living assistance amount is a true game changer for Holberton students, especially in a city as affordable as Tulsa, OK. In Tulsa, where a single bedroom apartment costs approximately $600 per month, students who receive this living assistance will be able to utilize this assistance to cover most-to-all of their living expenses. This is an incredible opportunity for everyone who wants to come to Holberton and launch their career in software engineering.

An additional incentive will also be available to Holberton School Tulsa students who continue to live and work in Tulsa after graduation. For students who fall in love with the city and decide to stay, students could see a reduction in their ISA repayment amount from 17% to 10%. This means that students who stay and work in Tulsa will repay significantly less than if they were to move out of the city. And companies are already eager to hire Holberton students:

Pictured here is Zac Carman, CEO at consumeraffairs.com
“ConsumerAffairs cannot wait to hire engineers from Holberton. Holberton will help close the engineering talent gap in Tulsa which will help us compete regionally. ” Zac Carman, CEO at consumeraffairs.com

The best part is that staying in Tulsa is easy. A generous and welcoming community, Tulsa is not bound by traditional conventions. Nationally recognized as the state’s center for economic development, Tulsa has a diverse economy and employment opportunities in finance, aeronautics, telecommunications, and technology. Companies like Bank of Oklahoma, American Airlines, AAON, Helmerich & Payne, ONEGas, ONEOK, Quiktrip and Williams Companies, have established their headquarters in the metropolitan area of Tulsa.

Once named America’s “Oil Capital of the World”, recent revitalization has transformed Tulsa from a vital hub for America’s oil and gas industry to a diverse, vibrant community with room for all types of passions and vocations to prosper.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 26921070264_64175b192e_o-1024x768.jpg
A perfect blend of metropolitan life and open skies. Photo via JustTulsa.com

Tulsa’s fun and vibrant culture and entrepreneurial spirit have built a city that embraces inclusion and champions big ideas. It’s a city that intentionally builds itself around the people already here while making itself available for newcomers. Home to two world-renowned art museums, a booming nightlife, and a diverse food scene, there’s always something to do in the “Center of the Universe”. The city boasts short commute times, more than 125 parks, 180 miles of bicycle and pedestrian trails, and a passion for supporting their local, pro and college sports teams.

And the employment opportunities for Holberton Tulsa students are bright: The “2019 Emsi Report on Computer and Mathematical Jobs in NE Oklahoma” projects an amazing 7,000 additional job postings for tech talent in Tulsa by 2025.

Tulsa will feature many of the same amazing facility perks that we have at our campuses around the world.

These awesome benefits, both the living assistance and the ISA discount, are available to both residents of Tulsa and to students who relocate to Tulsa. And for students to maximize their value from these programs, if the ISA discount will apply for every month they live and work in Tulsa, and any potential repayment of the living assistance program will be forgiven after just 2 years of residency in Tulsa. 

Thinking about how you can Define Your Future? Applications are now open for the January 2020 cohort at Tulsa! Start your application now, and you could start your new future as a software engineer!